Sunday, June 5, 2005


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Do you think that Christopher Cox will start to use a hands-off approach toward the finacial traders and big corporations, or will he continue in the footsteps of his predecessors?

Mr. Cox reviewed the book, Letters of Ayn Rand very favorable. On the other hand, Stephen Labaton of the New York Times is hardly a fan of Ayn Rand and he slaps a very inappropriate epithet to her philosophy in his article, Bush S.E.C. Pick Is Seen as Friend to Corporations.

Mr. Cox - a devoted student of Ayn Rand, the high priestess of unfettered capitalism - has a long record in the House of promoting the agenda of business interests that are a cornerstone of the Republican Party's political and financial support. (, 06/03/05.)

Robert Tracinski of The Intellectual Activist has the following comment:

President Bush has just appointed Rep. Christopher Cox as the new head of the SEC. The New York Times, describes Cox as "a devoted student of Ayn Rand, the high priestess of unfettered capitalism." Cox did write a very good, positive review of "The Letters of Ayn Rand" in the New York Times in 1995, and her influence is clear in the quotation from him below.

This signals an important and positive change in direction for the SEC. After the Enron scandal, Bush and congressional republicans appeased the leftist anti-business hysteria by passing the Sarbanes-Oxley regulations and supporting more aggressive controls by the SEC. Cox's appointment is clearly intended as a reversal of that trend. (, Ayn Rand at the SEC?, 06/03/05.)

Amy Borrus of the Business Week writes that Christopher Cox is liked by the Silicon Valley, but not by the investment community according to the Times Online.

Read Lawrence Kudlow's post, Cox's Nomination, and Stephen Bainbridge's article, Out With the Rockefeller Republican, In With the Reagan Revolutionary.

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UPDATE 06/06/05:
Read the Ayn Rand Institute's press release, Admirer of Ayn Rand to Head the SEC?