Wednesday, September 1, 2004

THE RELIGIOUS RIGHT IS WRONG

As a recap, read my post, 100 DAYS UNTIL THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. It is now only two months to go... Have you decided who you should pick yet? I don't think that this is a good sign:

Party Disfavors


In the news:

In an interview with SIRUS satellite radio, the Internet's Drudge Report said Wednesday, Keyes called Mary Cheney "a 'selfish hedonist' because she is a lesbian." (Washington Times / UPI, 09/01/04.)


It looks like the Cheney family is attacked by the religious right. Read Lorraine Woellert's article, The GOP's Strains Are Showing.

I will listen to Leonard Peikoff's statement on the upcoming election, as soon as I get a Linux audio player installed on the new computer. For more on this issue, check out the discussion at Objectivism Online Forum and read the posts A Vote for Bush and Bush for President.

I wonder if this third party candidate is using the phrase: "peace out, dawg"...

UPDATE 09/03/04:

From George F. Will's article, A Goldwater Revival:

The reemergence into Republican respectability of conservatism with a socially libertarian cast -- Goldwaterism -- is a development with a large potential to discomfort the Democratic Party. The reemergence can make the Republican Party more appealing to many young and suburban voters, two cohorts in which Democrats have recently made substantial gains. (Washington Post, 09/02/04.)


Here is Robert Tracinski's comment on the above mentioned article:

There are two sides to the low profile of the religious right at the Republican convention. George Will names the good side: the Republicans are sending a message that non-religious pro-free-marketers are welcome in the party. But he is wrong in thinking that we can turn the clock back to 1964--because the other side of the story is that the religionists still provide the main moral foundation for the right. (TIA Daily, Commentary: Goldwater Returns?, 09/02/04.)


Here is an excerpt from Todd Gitlin's article, The Left Learns from Goldwater:

That is, if they're smart. The post-Goldwater Republicans were smart. Despite what looked like a calamity, they didn't bolt from the GOP. They didn't break off as a third party, though some of them dearly wanted to. Will the rebellious left discipline itself, cool its boiling blood, and decide that the pleasures of sectarianism are worth less than the steady resolve of infrastructural work? (Washington Monthly, September issue.)