Monday, December 27, 2004


In the news: Yushchenko wins Ukraine election.

Dick Morris has served as a consultant to Viktor Yushchenko. Read his article, Inside Ukraine's Freedom Fight. [Via Rob Tracinski's post, Inside the Orange Revolution.] Will the election outcome have a positive "domino effect" on other states? Pete du Pont, Chairman of the National Center for Policy Analysis, says:

That a genuine democratic revolution is underway is clear from Mr. Yushchenko's approximate 16 point margin in Sunday's re-election, an enormous victory for freedom that may encourage Belarus, Moldova and other Russian subsidiary states to end their totalitarianism too. (OpinionJournal, 12/27/04.)

From Putin's Big Blunder by Dick Morris and Eileen McGann:

We are picking up the seismic shock from the streets of Kiev in the little nation of Moldova, where we are helping the pro-democracy forces.

This tiny nation, formerly the Soviet Socialist Republic of Moldova, was once a province of Romania but was given to Moscow in the Hitler-Stalin Pact of 1939. Nominally independent since the Soviet Union broke up in '91, Moldova has actually been headed by a communist government that would like to go back under Russian hegemony. (, 12/22/04.)

I have to celebrate the orange revolution in Ukraine with a chestnut crêpe (gesztenye palacsinta) when I am back in Hungary in January.

UPDATE 12/28/04:
Read John Fund's article, From America With Love. Ukraine's new first lady knows what freedom really means.

Here is Robert Tracinski's comment (The American Roots of the Orange Revolution):
Meanwhile, free elections have won the day in Ukraine, where the "Orange Revolution" has won a decisive victory in one of the last battles of the Cold War. I have written before about how America's example is an important root of the Orange Revolution, but this report makes the link much more concrete, profiling the American-born, University-of-Chicago-educated wife of Ukrainian president-elect Viktor Yuschenko. (TIA Daily, 12/28/04.)